Finding a Manuscript Editor

Ah, the daunting task of finding an editor. And not just any editor . . . the right editor. The one who will mesh the best with you and your style of writing. From knowing what kind of editing your manuscript needs to understanding pricing, it’s enough to make anyone’s head spin.

findingamanuscripteditor

First things first:

  1. Ask for a sample edit.
    Most editors will provide a free sample edit, generally up to a certain word or page count. This is a great way to gauge if you and your editor will be a good fit; it gives you an opportunity to take a look at what kind of feedback the editor gives. Did they mesh well with your particular voice? Did they allow your writing to keep its unique tone and voice, or did the editor try to mold it to fit their own voice? Did they miss any glaring errors? Was their feedback constructive and helpful, or was it condescending?
  2. Find out what kind of experience and/or qualifications they have.
    Have they worked for a publishing house? Do they have many years experience, or are they just starting out? Keep in mind that’s there’s nothing wrong with opting for someone who’s just starting out; in fact, it may save you a few bucks. You might find college students or even professors who freelance part-time. I, myself, am a college student, majoring in English and Creative Writing with a concentration in fiction, and will soon be offering editing services — keep checking back!(Personal experience: I once made the mistake of not finding out an editor’s experience/qualifications. She had a good price on manuscript evaluations, so I figured, why not? I was looking for feedback beyond beta readers on a manuscript I’d already done several rounds of revisions on. Some of her comments made it sound like she barely dealt with the public — quite condescending and closed-minded. Also, her feedback was all over the place and contradictory. She came across more like somebody who just likes to read as opposed to a qualified editor. Fortunately, I was only out ~$20 and a lesson learned.)
  3. Know what their main focus is.
    What type of editing are they most comfortable with? Proofreading, copy, or developmental? Substantive/line? Fiction or non-fiction? Genre? Some editors may focus solely on one or the other, while some may do more than one. What’s also important is to know what type of editing your manuscript needs. Proofreading should be the very last step, while developmental should come first.
  4. Find out their pricing before asking for a sample edit.
    Don’t waste their time and your time by asking for a sample edit before finding out if they’re out of your budget.

Finding the right editor, the one who meshes well with you and your writing, can make all the difference in the editing stages of your manuscript. Working with the wrong editor will make the whole experience unpleasant (and potentially cost you more money if you end up having to hire a different editor — I’ve been there!). Take the time to make a list of potential editors and ask for sample edits, and make sure to keep an open mind to editors.

Here are some extra resources to help you find the right editor:

The Editorial Freelancers Association: www.the-efa.org
Standout Books: https://www.standoutbooks.com/how-choose-right-editor/
The Creative Penn: https://www.thecreativepenn.com/2014/07/14/how-to-find-the-right-editor/
The Write Life: https://thewritelife.com/how-to-find-an-editor-crucial-questions/

 

Advertisements

Beta Readers: How to Utilize the Power of Readers

What exactly is a beta reader? Simply put, it’s an average joe reader who gives feedback for an unpublished manuscript.

betareaders

(It’s a betta fish…get it?! …I thought it was funny…)

Betas give feedback and offer suggestions for “suspension of disbelief”/believability, continuity and general flow of the story, any possible plot holes, characterization, etc. Betas who are not writers themselves can make some of the best beta readers, as they tend to not over analyze every minute detail of the story like writers. They can take in the story as a whole and get a better view of the big picture.

Should you consider looking for beta readers? Yes! After working on a manuscript for what seems like an eternity, it’s hard to look at our own work objectively. Betas can read your work with fresh eyes and a completely new, unbiased take on it.

There are some important things to remember when working with beta readers:

  • Be up front and clear about what you are and are not looking for. What kind of feedback are you looking for? Characterization? Plot holes? Descriptions? Voice? Flow? Recurring grammar faux pas like dangling modifiers?
  • Know your target audience. If possible, find beta readers within your target audience. Is your story intended for young adults? 18+ adults only? Businessmen? Stay-at-home moms who need a break from the kids? You’ll get the most useful feedback from betas roughly within your target audience and, in turn, gauge what kind of revisions you may need to make. Avoid having family and friends beta read for you. As much as they insist that they can give you helpful feedback, the fact that they know you personally can influence how they see the story.
  • Edit your manuscript to the best of your abilities. Yes, it’s still an unpublished manuscript, but it’s important to give your betas the most polished writing you can give. Even if it hasn’t been to a professional editor yet, revise and edit as much as you can. Take your time with edits, and don’t rush. Remember, some of these beta readers may end up recommending your upcoming novel to people they know — or worse, telling them to steer clear.
  • Have several file options available. Some authors think it’s all about them, when in reality, it’s about the readers. Make it as easy as possible for them to read your work. Ask your betas if they have a preference for file type and, inversely, let them know what types you’re able to provide, such as .pdf, .mobi, .docx.
  • Be considerate of their time. This goes both ways. Authors, remember that betas are taking time out of their day to read your work. Don’t expect them to read and have their comments/notes written within 24 hours. Also, refrain from asking someone to beta for you until you’re absolutely ready for beta readers.
    Readers, remember that authors may have a timeline they’re working on. Don’t dilly dally or put off reading the manuscript for weeks at a time.
  • Get some thick skin. It sounds harsh, but remember to not take feedback personally. Be prepared for both positive and negative feedback. Never lash out or defend yourself against something a beta reader says. Even if you don’t agree with their critique right off the bat, give yourself some time to consider their suggestions. Again, don’t become defensive. Just be gracious for their time and remember to thank them.

 

There are many places to find beta readers — even sites like the Goodreads forums and Tumblr. I also offer more in-depth editing services such as developmental and substantive editing. You can check out pricing info here or email me at allison@thesentrancedwriter.com.